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Old 04-07-2018, 04:32 PM   #1
IanT-EJ22
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Location: Waterbury Center, Vermont
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Default My complete turbo build list-Turbo EJ222

I have researched everything I will need to turbo my 2000 Impreza Outback Sport. It has the Phase 2, 2.2L, SOHC, Single Port Head, EJ222 motor. Not a ton of people out there boosting these motors but they are a great motor to do it to from what I've found and those that have, have had nothing but good experiences. They have a reasonable compression ratio, strong internals and there was even a factory turbocharged version made that was in the Legacy. Here is a link to the document I made containing a complete list of parts needed with pictures and prices. This is a BUDGET build, so I chose the cheapest route possible in most cases. If your thinking of going turbo on your car, check out my list, it has everything you would need as far as what major components are required. I am open to anyone wanting to comment on what I chose or anyone who might have used parts i need. Let me know what you guys think.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/e...ugtagdcXGX/pub
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Old 04-08-2018, 06:53 PM   #2
pcampbell
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A fellow Boosted NA subaru right here in Washington County Vermont!!!! I am in Warren. Blue 05 Outback with a supercharger whine!

Is it up and running or are you just starting out?

I have no idea how you do engine management on yours--what will you do for that?

On the plugs, I bet you don't need 7 heat range , probably just 6. Is stock 5 or 6?
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Old 04-09-2018, 09:47 AM   #3
pcampbell
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On the plugs... I might spring for iridium plugs (get the right pre gapped gap) after reading this about iridiums - theyre like 8 bucks each. basicall the iridums just handle the boost best and you can get away with wider gap on iridums without misfires.
http://kennebell.net//wp-content/upl...PARK-PLUGS.pdf


I think you'd be fine even better off with 420cc injectors.

I have a set of lightly used 420s you can have (free for fellow VTer), but I'd suggest you have them tested and cleaned. I took them out for more boost, but I feel like they were not perfectly flow matched (just a hunch).
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Old 04-11-2018, 04:53 PM   #4
IanT-EJ22
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Warren, thats awesome! I love Vermont and my first Subaru.

Did you go to Harwood? I graduated in '08.

The car is not currently turbo, but it is up and running, very well I might add. I have really gone through and replaced or serviced just about everything and aside from it's very poor paint and semi-rough body condition, there is no major rust and the car drives like new. My turbo kit looks like it will cost me right around $1,500-$2,000 to be all tuned and driving, really not that much $ for an extra 90 or so hp.

Management:
I guess on EJ222 motors, they are a speed density type fuel injection system, meaning they don't use a mass air flow sensor. On these cars the factory system can actually compensate for boost on its own, ASIDE from the need for a voltage clamp placed on the manifold absolute pressure sensor. Once you got the voltage clamp on there the ecu can add necessary fuel all on its own, it has maps in the ecu that extend that far. The real required changes are larger injectors, a upgraded fuel pump and the voltage clamp to trick the map sensor.

Plugs:
I haven't really researched enough to know exactly what heat range to use but I have read of a few different boosted N/A subarus that ran the NGK 7 range. I do want to make sure I get the best suited plug for the car. Its a 10:1 compression motor so its on the high side for boost but the amount of boost and power it makes will determine alot, also what fuel I decide to run (Probably just high octane pump, 91 or 93). Maybe I'll look into what the factory turbo Legacy 2.2L motors ran for plugs? Or what the EJ20 in the '02-'07 WRX's run.
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Old 04-11-2018, 05:41 PM   #5
IanT-EJ22
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From what I've read on plugs:

Staying as close to a stock plug on a Subaru is best.
Go with what the owners manual suggests.
NGK is the best Option.
NGK Copper is the way to go, despite being very cheap, they actually give the best performance (Idle, HP, Fuel Economy, Lifespan).
NGK Platinums and Iridiums are considered an upgrade but an unnecessary one.

Heat Range:
Lower #'s indicate a hotter plug heat range and Higher #s a colder heat range.
Turbo motors, due to increases in cylinder pressures and temperatures, require a colder than factory heat range. This prevents overheating of the plug and engine, as well as pre-ignition.
*1 Heat range colder is suggested for every 75-100hp increase.
I plan to add about 88-90 hp so 1 heat range colder makes sense.

Either the NGK V-Powers or the NGK G-Power Platinums are the best option.
These are the two plugs used on the Stock, Naturally Aspirated, 2.2L, SOHC, Phase 2, EJ222 Engine (According the NGK.com's Vehicle based plug finder):
V-Power: BKR5E-11
-Center Electrode Core Material Type: Copper
-Center Electrode Tip Material: Nickel w/ V Groove
-Gap: 0.040"
-Resistance: 5000 ohms
-Heat Range: 5

G-Power: BKR5EGP
-Center Electrode Core Material Type: Copper
-Center Electrode Tip Material: Platinum
-Gap: 0.040"
-Resistance: 5000 ohms
-Heat Range: 5

This is the NGK Replacment Plug recommended by Subaru which is a NGK BKR6E-11 and is a heat range 6 not a 5 like the above V-Power and G-Power plugs that NGK recommends on their website for the EJ222.
V-Power: BKR6E-11
-Center Electrode Core Material Type: Copper
-Center Electrode Tip Material: Nickel w/ V Groove
-Gap: 0.040"
-Resistance: 5000 ohms
-Heat Range: 6

If Subaru recommends a heat range 6 and NGK recommends a heat range 5 for the stock, n/a EJ222 then id'd say for a boosted EJ22, a heat range 6 option would be on the hot side with a higher resistance to the arc being "blown out" but an increase in operating temps and higher likelyhood for pre-ignition. A heat range 7 would be on the safer side, with lower plug and cylinder head operating temps but with a arc more prone to being blown out. So my conclusion, run a heat range 6 or 7, copper, NGK plug on a boosted 2.2L, SOHC, Phase 2, EJ222.

Plug Gap:
-Gap has a direct relationship to the temperature of the spark plugs tip as well as the voltage necessary to ignite the air/fuel mixture.
-High compression or forced induction engines require a smaller gap to ensure the denser air/fuel charge is properly ignited.
-The burn efficiency of the spark plug, it's arc as well as the air/fuel charge are increased to more efficient levels with a larger gap but ONLY with an applicable increase in arc voltage.

Id say if I were to run a heat range 6 plug. I would have a hotter plug with a longer insulator nose that runs at higher temps, meaning a hotter running cylinder head and engine. With this, I would want to run the factory 0.040" gap. This would mean OEM performance in terms of arc blow out and efficiency of the air/fuel mixture ignition but less likelihood of pre-ignition. A smaller than 0.040" gap would lead to pre-ignition and overheating. One option for the heat range 6 plug would be to upgrade the ignition coils for an increase in ignition voltage across the gap but run a larger than factory gap. A sort of hotter plug but with a larger, higher power arc across a larger gap that would still retain reasonable combustion temps and burn characteristics.
I would also consider a heat range 7 plug. This would mean a cooler plug with a shorter insulator nose. If I were to run the heat range 7 I would consider maybe a smaller than factory plug gap for an increase in arc intensity, the smaller gap on the cooler plug could also be complimented by a higher power ignition coil configuration but again, pre-ignition and overheating are more likely with the smaller gap.

Last edited by IanT-EJ22; 04-11-2018 at 06:39 PM.
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Old 04-11-2018, 07:22 PM   #6
pcampbell
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Nice, sounds like it should be pretty easy then!

I hadn't thought that much about the gap and the plug!!! The raptor SC guy had me put in a BKR6EIX11 (stock ej253 is heat range 5). but I have also lately been running a cheap copper plug with slightly smaller gap . I honestly couldn't tell the difference. I was planning on going to a smaller gap with the bigger boost but it may not even be needed. I have also read that the iridium plugs will not blow out as easily. I never saw any misfires with the big (.043") 1.1mm gap at 6 psi. General consensus seems to be run the biggest gap you can get away with so I should probably go back to those until otherwise necessary.

let me know if you want these WRX 420 injectors. Should be plenty (at least 250 crank hp or so I think) for your goals I think.

I did not go to harwood, we moved up here like 7 years ago and graduated longer ago than i care to think about ha ha.

Last edited by pcampbell; 04-11-2018 at 08:04 PM.
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Old 04-13-2018, 06:28 PM   #7
IanT-EJ22
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I might get back to you on the injectors, good chance I'll want em.

Bigger gap is better but only with more voltage across it. Boost requires smaller gap or a normal gap with increased voltage.

Thanks for your post. Real cool to see a fellow VT'er and not only that but the same county.
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Old 06-21-2019, 11:16 AM   #8
rab71
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Bring this back for a second... How did you control the larger injectors? Stand alone?
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:26 AM   #9
battleloyale
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hey dude, not a bad looking list. I'm doing the same with mine. Mine is a 95 impeza L with dual port ej22 (im assuming phase 1, but its obd2.) I just aquired wrx headers, up pipe and intercooler from a 02, all stock but in decent shape. td04 from a 2004 FXT. How are you planning on running the o2 sensors? Looks like alot of these downpipes have only one bung, sometimes two. One being on the bell mouth and the other being farther downstream towards the mid pipe. I'd like to be able to keep my factory sensors in place to keep it running correctly.

From what I've seen, doing the custom up pipe route is fairly straight forward, just have to be sure the turbo is clocked correctly so it mates well with the downpipe and intake
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