Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Wednesday June 19, 2019
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Custom Fabrication, Welding & Tools

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads. 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-08-2019, 01:32 AM   #1
mitch808
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 10228
Join Date: Sep 2001
Vehicle:
2002 Subaru WRX

Default Drilling hardened steel

I need to drill a number of holes in hardened steel aka bumper beams.

Can anyone recommend some good affordable solutions?

Ive read about using carbide masonry bits or carbide glass/tile bits. Buying a dedicated set of carbide bits is about 10x the cost...
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
mitch808 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Old 03-08-2019, 05:30 PM   #2
car_freak85
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 13530
Join Date: Dec 2001
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Cascadia
Vehicle:
EA63 , EA81T, EJ20G,
EJ205

Default

Turn the speed WAAAAY down, lots of lube, drill bit sharpener... Or spend the money for the right bits. Keep the heat down as much as possible so it doesn't work harden the already tough material.

That's what I'd do, outside having the right bits on hand.
car_freak85 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2019, 07:36 PM   #3
gjkrisa
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 461897
Join Date: Jan 2017
Default

If you use titanium bits it only takes a drop of oil till you notice the bit is dry and keep the drill speed down you shouldn't have much issue just also use a good amount of force
If the bit is smoking your are using to much speed if the drill slows down when applying force you are using to much force
Unless the bit is almost thru then you use more speed less force to try and make the back more smooth
Carbid will be easier and last longer but titanium will also last a long time and are way cheaper.
gjkrisa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2019, 11:04 PM   #4
speedyHAM
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 48377
Join Date: Nov 2003
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: "They eat fish soaked in lye"
Vehicle:
1996 Gutted, built
XP class Impreza L

Default

Bumper beams are not that hard to drill. Just keep the speed down as stated and use plenty of machine oil. Sharpen the bit beforehand or buy a new one.
speedyHAM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 02:54 PM   #5
isotopesope
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 265783
Join Date: Dec 2010
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Location: the fern behind the porn couch
Vehicle:
2017 Forester XT
Niner ROS 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitch808 View Post
I need to drill a number of holes in hardened steel aka bumper beams. Can anyone recommend some good affordable solutions? Ive read about using carbide masonry bits or carbide glass/tile bits. Buying a dedicated set of carbide bits is about 10x the cost...
did you get your holes drilled? ba dum tah!

i'm quite late to the thread, but i would recommend a cobalt coated drill (HSCO), be sure to center punch the locations so the drill doesn't walk, and use lots of cutting oil. yeah, you can definitely use a tungsten carbide tipped masonry drill, but a true carbide drill should NEVER be used in a hand drill or even a drill press. they are too fragile for that. those are really for CNC use only.
isotopesope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2019, 10:51 PM   #6
CarmelValleyWRX
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 453872
Join Date: Sep 2016
Vehicle:
2005 wrx wagon
48w

Default

a bumper beam is mild steel as far as i know...
CarmelValleyWRX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2019, 02:15 PM   #7
mitch808
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 10228
Join Date: Sep 2001
Vehicle:
2002 Subaru WRX

Default

This isnt a subaru application. It is not mild steel rather some alloy short of maybe true hardened stuff
mitch808 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2019, 11:17 AM   #8
Zombie Panda
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 425346
Join Date: Jul 2015
Chapter/Region: South East
Default

You can anneal the area first with a torch. Then use tungsten carbide bit. You may get by with cobalt (not Kobalt-Lowe's brand). HSS or titanium coated will not drill hardened steel.
Zombie Panda is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-09-2019, 09:41 AM   #9
rtv900
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 428511
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: philadelphia
Vehicle:
2016 STI

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by isotopesope View Post
but a true carbide drill should NEVER be used in a hand drill or even a drill press. they are too fragile for that. those are really for CNC use only.
meh, a carbide drill is fine in a manual press unless it's some harbor freight china deluxe that slops around .030 each way.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mitch808 View Post
This isnt a subaru application. It is not mild steel rather some alloy short of maybe true hardened stuff
not sure on a subaru, but I modified my bumper brackets on my 1950 to tuck the bumpers in, so I needed to drill them.
Holy crow was that ultra tough steel, I had no idea what I was in for.
HSS didn't even touch it. I had to use a solid carbide end mill.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zombie Panda View Post
You can anneal the area first with a torch. Then use tungsten carbide bit. You may get by with cobalt (not Kobalt-Lowe's brand). HSS or titanium coated will not drill hardened steel.
WHAT?
Then he's just annealed his brackets!!!!!!! Don't tell me he can re-heat treat them with a torch having no experience doing that?
rtv900 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2019, 08:17 AM   #10
isotopesope
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 265783
Join Date: Dec 2010
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Location: the fern behind the porn couch
Vehicle:
2017 Forester XT
Niner ROS 9

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rtv900 View Post
meh, a carbide drill is fine in a manual press unless it's some harbor freight china deluxe that slops around .030 each way.
We'll have to agree to disagree on that one. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

Also... HF!? Have I not proven myself enough to be an anti-China snob? I never use a single Chinese made anything in my shop. Nearly every single cutter, insert, or drill I use is USA made.
isotopesope is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-16-2019, 03:23 PM   #11
rtv900
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 428511
Join Date: Aug 2015
Location: philadelphia
Vehicle:
2016 STI

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by isotopesope View Post
We'll have to agree to disagree on that one. Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.

Also... HF!? Have I not proven myself enough to be an anti-China snob? I never use a single Chinese made anything in my shop. Nearly every single cutter, insert, or drill I use is USA made.
I wasn't implying you use china deluxos, just saying.
rtv900 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2019, 09:58 PM   #12
Jack
Add Lightness
Moderator
 
Member#: 13699
Join Date: Dec 2001
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Hopkinton, MA
Vehicle:
not my president
(From General)

Default

Drill a smaller pilot hole first.
Jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2019 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2017, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.