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Old 08-31-2015, 07:47 PM   #1076
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all of the western union/telegram services went away when whatshisface was indicted. the least sketchy but still sketchy as **** way is localbitcoins.com and meeting someone at a coffee shop or something

coinbase is the safest but it takes days and you have to set up bank account transfers.

https://www.bitfinex.com/

is supposed to be the new goto method but Ive never used it ymmv
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Old 08-31-2015, 08:04 PM   #1077
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Circle. Hands down.
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Old 08-31-2015, 10:59 PM   #1078
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Coinbase is cool? They're the ones who freaked me the hell out by asking for my actual online banking login. Better to go with account and routing numbers? is that any safer?

:shudder:

EDIT: Any y'all want to sell me $40 worth of btc?
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Old 12-09-2015, 10:17 AM   #1079
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Quote:
Bitcoin’s Creator Satoshi Nakamoto Is Probably This Unknown Australian Genius

EVEN AS HIS face towered 10 feet above the crowd at the Bitcoin Investor’s Conference in Las Vegas, Craig Steven Wright was, to most of the audience of crypto and finance geeks, a nobody.

The 44-year-old Australian, Skyping into the D Hotel ballroom’s screen, wore the bitcoin enthusiast’s equivalent of camouflage: a black blazer and a tieless, rumpled shirt, his brown hair neatly parted. His name hadn’t made the conference’s list of “featured speakers.” Even the panel’s moderator, a bitcoin blogger named Michele Seven, seemed concerned the audience wouldn’t know why he was there. Wright had hardly begun to introduce himself as a “former academic who does research that no one ever hears about,” when she interrupted him.

“Hold on a second, who are you?” Seven cut in, laughing. “Are you a computer scientist?”

“I’m a bit of everything,” Wright responded. “I have a master’s in law…a master’s in statistics, a couple doctorates…”

“How did you first learn about bitcoin?” Seven interrupted again, as if still trying to clarify Wright’s significance.

Wright paused for three full seconds. “Um. I’ve been involved with all this for a long time,” he stuttered. “I—try and stay—I keep my head down. Um…” He seemed to suppress a smile. The panel’s moderator moved on. And for what must have been the thousandth time in his last seven years of obscurity, Wright did not say the words WIRED’s study of Wright over the past weeks suggests he may be dying to say out loud.

“I am Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of bitcoin.”

Since that pseudonymous figure first released bitcoin’s code on January 9th, 2009, Nakamoto’s ingenious digital currency has grown from a nerd novelty to a kind of economic miracle. As it’s been adopted for everything from international money transfers to online narcotrafficking, the total value of all bitcoins has grown to nearly $5 billion. Nakamoto himself, whoever he is, appears to control a stash of bitcoins easily worth a nine-figure fortune (it rose to more than a billion at the cryptocurrency’s peak exchange rate in 2014). But the true identity of bitcoin’s creator remains a cipher. Media outlets from the New Yorker to Fast Company to Newsweek have launched investigations into unmasking Nakamoto that were either inconclusive or, in Newsweek’s case, pointed to a man who subsequently denied having anything to do with cryptography, not to mention cryptocurrency. Altogether, the world’s Satoshi-seekers have hardly put a dent in one of the most stubborn mysteries of the 21st century, one whose answer could resonate beyond a small sphere of crypto geeks and have real economic effects.

In the last weeks, WIRED has obtained the strongest evidence yet of Satoshi Nakamoto’s true identity. The signs point to Craig Steven Wright, a man who never even made it onto any Nakamoto hunters’ public list of candidates, yet fits the cryptocurrency creator’s profile in nearly every detail. And despite a massive trove of evidence, we still can’t say with absolute certainty that the mystery is solved. But two possibilities outweigh all others: Either Wright invented bitcoin, or he’s a brilliant hoaxer who very badly wants us to believe he did.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LdvQTwjVmrE

The Evidence

The first evidence pointing to Wright appeared in mid-November, when an anonymous source close to Wright began leaking documents to Gwern Branwen, a pseudonymous, independent security researcher and dark web analyst. Branwen provided those documents to WIRED, and they immediately led to several direct, publicly visible connections between Nakamoto and Wright:

An August 2008 post on Wright’s blog, months before the November 2008 introduction of the bitcoin whitepaper on a cryptography mailing list. It mentions his intention to release a “cryptocurrency paper,” and references “triple entry accounting,” the title of a 2005 paper by financial cryptographer Ian Grigg that outlines several bitcoin-like ideas.
A post on the same blog from November, 2008. It includes a request that readers who want to get in touch encrypt their messages to him using a PGP public key apparently linked to Satoshi Nakamoto. A PGP key is a unique string of characters that allows a user of that encryption software to receive encrypted messages. This one, when checked against the database of the MIT server where it was stored, is associated with the email address [email protected], an email address very similar to the [email protected] address Nakamoto used to send the whitepaper introducing bitcoin to a cryptography mailing list.

An archived copy of a now-deleted blog post from Wright dated January 10, 2009, which reads: “The Beta of Bitcoin is live tomorrow. This is decentralized… We try until it works.” (The post was dated January 10, 2009, a day after Bitcoin’s official launch on January 9th of that year. But if Wright, living in Eastern Australia, posted it after midnight his time on the night of the 9th, that would have still been before bitcoin’s launch at 3pm EST on the 9th.) That post was later replaced with the rather cryptic text “Bitcoin – AKA bloody nosey you be…It does always surprise me how at times the best place to hide [is] right in the open.” Sometime after October of this year, it was deleted entirely.



In addition to those three blog posts, we received a cache of leaked emails, transcripts, and accounting forms that corroborate the link. There’s a leaked message from Wright to his lawyer date June 2008 in which Wright imagines “a P2P distributed ledger”—an apparent reference to bitcoin’s public record of transactions known as the blockchain, long before it was publicly released. The email goes on to reference a paper called “Electronic Cash Without a Trusted Third Party” that Wright expects to release in 2009.

Another leaked email from Wright to computer forensics analyst David Kleiman, a close friend and confidant, just before bitcoin’s January 2009 launch discusses a paper they’d been working on together. Wright talks about taking a buyout from his job and investing in hundreds of computer processors to “get [his] idea going.” There’s also a PDF authored by Kleiman, who died in April of 2013, in which he agrees to take control of a trust fund, codenamed the “Tulip Trust,” containing 1.1 million bitcoins. The PDF is signed with Kleiman’s PGP signature, a cryptographic technique that ensures it couldn’t have been altered post-signature.

That million-coin trove—The Tulip Trust—is the same size as a mysterious bitcoin fortune that’s long been visible on bitcoin’s blockchain and widely attributed to Satoshi Nakamoto. No one but Nakamoto is known to have assembled such a massive hoard of the cryptocurrency, and only Nakamoto could have generated so many bitcoins so early in its evolution, when a bitcoin could be “mined” with relatively small amounts of processing power. Only one such bitcoin megapile exists, and the closely-watched coins haven’t moved in bitcoin’s entire history.

Another clue as to Wright’s bitcoin fortune wasn’t leaked to WIRED but instead remains hosted on the website of the corporate advisory firm McGrathNicol: a liquidation report on one of several companies Wright founded known as Hotwire, an attempt to create a bitcoin-based bank. It shows that the startup was backed in June 2013 by $23 million in bitcoins owned by Wright. That sum would be worth more than $60 million today. At the time of the company’s incorporation, Wright’s investment in that one firm alone represented more than 1.5 percent of all existing bitcoins, a strangely large stash for an unknown player in the bitcoin world.

The giveaways go on: There’s a leaked email from Wright to an associate in January 2014 about a tax dispute with the Australian government. In it, he seems to consider using Nakamoto’s name to wield influence with New South Wales Senator Arthur Sinodinos “Would our Japanese friend have weight coming out of retirement?” Wright asks. It includes a draft email to the senator signed “Satoshi Nakamoto.” And a leaked transcript of Wright’s meeting with attorneys and tax officials in February 2014 quotes him in a moment of exasperation: “I did my best to try and hide the fact that I’ve been running bitcoin since 2009,” Wright says. “By the end of this I think half the world is going to bloody know.”

Making Contact
On December 1st, WIRED sent an encrypted email to Wright suggesting that we knew his secret and asking for a meeting. A few hours later, we received a wary response from the address [email protected], a cyberpunk reference to a rich and powerful corporate dynasty in William Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy. Wright had referenced the same fictional family in the bio of his private twitter profile. The email’s IP showed that it came from an IP address in Panama controlled by Vistomail, the same service that Satoshi Nakamoto had used to send his emails introducing bitcoin and to run Bitcoin.org. “This is a throw away account. There are ways even with [the anonymity software] Tor, but the people in Panama are exteremly [sic] good and do not violate people’s desired privacy,” the email read. “You are digging, the question is how deep are you?” The message ended, “Regards, the Director of Tessier-Ashpool”

A few hours later, we received another, even more perplexing message from the same account. “The nature of this moniker is selected for a purpose. I now have resources. This makes me a we now. I am still within that early phase of learning just what my capabilities happen to be. So, even now with resources I remain vulnerable,” it read. “You seem to know a few things. More than you should.”

When we responded by describing the three blog posts that showed Wright’s clear connection to bitcoin’s creation and asking again for a meeting, he gave a revealing answer. “Although we all desire some level of credit, I have moved past many of these things,” read his response from the same Tessier-Ashpool account. “Too many already know secrets, the world does not need to know. There are other means to lead change than to be a dictator.”

After our second followup message asking for a chance to talk, Wright responded that he would consider our request. Then he stopped responding altogether.

Dropping Breadcrumbs?
Despite that overwhelming collection of clues, none of it fully proves that Wright is Nakamoto. All of it could be an elaborate hoax—perhaps orchestrated by Wright himself. The unverified leaked documents could be faked in whole or in part. And most inexplicably of all, comparisons of different archived versions of the three smoking gun posts from Wright’s blog show that he did edit all three—to insert evidence of his bitcoin history. The PGP key associated with Nakamoto’s email address and references to an upcoming “cryptocurrency paper” and “triple entry accounting” were added sometime after 2013. Even the post noting bitcoin’s beta launch is questionable. While it was ostensibly posted in January 2009, it later seems to have been deleted and then undeleted—or possibly even written for the first time—sometime between October 2013 and June of 2014.

Why those breadcrumbs were dropped remains a mystery. Is Wright trying to falsely steal Nakamoto’s glory (or money)? Is he quietly revealing himself as bitcoin’s creator?

But this much is clear: If Wright is seeking to fake his Nakamoto connection, his hoax would be practically as ambitious as bitcoin itself. Some of the clues added to his blog were made more than 20 months ago—a very patient deception if it were one. His references to Grigg’s “triple entry accounting” paper would represent an uncannily inventive lie, representing a new and obscure possible inspiration for bitcoin. And there’s little doubt Wright is a certified bitcoin mogul. Even the $60 million portion of his cryptocurrency stash that’s verifiable in McGrathNicol’s public audit record is suspiciously large.

More circumstantially, Wright’s blog, his public records, and his verified writings on mail lists and Twitter sketch a man who matches with Satoshi Nakamoto’s known characteristics well enough to place him leagues above other candidates. He’s a former subscriber to the 1990s “cypherpunks” mailing list devoted to anti-authoritarianism and encryption, an advocate of gold as a financial tool, an accomplished C++ coder, a security professional plausibly capable of writing a tough-to-hack protocol like bitcoin, a libertarian who battled with tax authorities, and a fan of Japanese culture.

He is also—parallels to Nakamoto aside—a strange and remarkable person: an almost obsessive autodidact and double-PhD who once boasted of obtaining new graduate degrees at a rate of about one a year. He’s a climate-change denier, a serial entrepreneur who started companies ranging from security consultancies to a bitcoin bank, and an eccentric who wrote on his blog that he once accepted a challenge to create a pencil from scratch and spent years on the problem, going so far as to make his own bricks to build his own kiln in which to mix the pencil’s graphite.

Wright’s blogging and leaked emails describe a man so committed to an unproven cryptocurrency idea that he mortgaged three properties and invested more than $1 million in computers, power, and connectivity—even going so far as to lay fiberoptic cables to his remote rural home in eastern Australia to mine the first bitcoins. His company, Tulip Trading, built two supercomputers that have officially ranked among the top 500 in the world, both seemingly related to his cryptocurrency projects. (Wright seems to enjoy tulip references, a likely taunt at those who have compared bitcoin to the Netherlands’ 17th century “tulip bubble.”) The first of those supercomputers he named Sukuriputo Okane—Japanese for “script money.” Another, named Co1n, holds the title of the world’s most powerful privately owned supercomputer. As Wright told the Bitcoin Investor’s conference, he’s applying that second machine towards the mysterious task of “modeling Bitcoin’s scalability,” and meanwhile building an even more powerful supercomputing cluster in Iceland because of its cheap geothermal power.

Bitcoin watchers have long wondered why the giant cache of coins they attribute to Satoshi Nakamoto never moved on the bitcoin’s publicly visible blockchain. Wright’s “Tulip” trust fund of 1.1 million bitcoins may hold the key to that mystery. The trust fund PDF signed by Wright’s late friend David Kleiman keeps those coins locked in place until 2020, yet gives Wright the freedom to borrow them for applications including “research into peer-to-peer systems” and “commercial activities that enhance the value and position of bitcoin.”

Despite those exceptions to the trust’s rules, the million-coin hoard has yet to budge, even after Kleiman’s death in 2013. That may be because Wright could be keeping the coins in place as an investment. He could be leveraging the trust in less visible ways, like legally transferring ownership of money to fund his companies while still leaving it at the same bitcoin address. Or he might still be waiting for January 1st, 2020, a countdown to a date that could take the lid off the biggest cryptocurrency fortune in history.

Coming Clean
In spite of all the clues as to Wright’s possible secret life—some that he apparently placed himself—Wright has demonstrated such a talent for obfuscation and a love of privacy that he’s never even raised the suspicions of most Nakamoto-worshipping bitcoiners. “If we don’t want to go out there and say ‘I’m a billionaire,’ or ‘I’m running XYZ,’ or ‘this is my life,’ I shouldn’t have to tell people that,” Wright told the Las Vegas crowd in October when an audience member asked his thoughts about what bitcoin means for property rights. “We should be able to choose how we live.”

In the leaked emails, Wright seems to bristle at the few times anyone has attempted to out bitcoin’s creator. “I am not from the bloody USA! Nor am I called Dorien [sic],” reads a message from Wright to a colleague dated March 6, 2014. That’s the same day as Newsweek’s largely discredited story claimed the inventor of bitcoin to be the American Dorian Satoshi Nakamoto.

{continued in link}

http://www.wired.com/2015/12/bitcoin...ralian-genius/
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Old 12-09-2015, 10:59 AM   #1080
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I read that, apparently the Australian authorities have since raided his house.
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Old 12-09-2015, 11:38 AM   #1081
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yeah and his office too. it will be really interesting to watch what happens with that "Tulip Trust" bitcoin stash now that he/they are out in the open
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Old 02-17-2016, 12:51 PM   #1082
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interesting development - the first real attempt to legitimize blockchain/bitcoin

Quote:
On Tuesday, IBM announced that it’s been working to make blockchain technology—which was refined and popularized by Bitcoin—easier for businesses to use for financial and non-financial purposes. Specifically, the company is launching what it’s calling “blockchain-as-a-service,” or a set of tools for "creating, deploying, running, and monitoring blockchain applications on the IBM Cloud.”

The idea of applying blockchain technology outside of the realm of Bitcoin has gained a lot of interest from forward-thinking companies in the past year or so. Blockchain applications are also called “distributed ledger technology” because they remove the need for a centralized database and, like Bitcoin, give every transaction in a particular system a cryptographic hash that can be checked by any member of the group.
Traditional financial institutions as well as startups hoping to serve those banks and stock exchanges have been among the first to glom onto the idea that a decentralized ledger could be used to make money transfer more reliable and more secure. If all parties can double check money transfers (even if they don’t know what was exchanged in the transfer), then theoretically, errors caused by mistake or malice could be reduced. Recently nine banking institutions including JP Morgan, BBVA, and Credit Suisse partnered with a company called R3 to work on decentralizing some databases. At the World Economic Forum in Davos this January, MasterCard officials said that the credit card network was carefully studying how to best apply blockchain concepts.

But IBM is targeting its new blockchain efforts not only at potential financial-industry customers, but at a variety of logistics customers as well. IBM spokesperson Holli Haswell told Ars that a good example for a non-monetary use of a distributed ledger could be shipping. If a business is trying to ship food across the county, the companies in contract with one another could “apply contract resolution and auditing to the blockchain if for instance a shipment of food is spoiled, allowing you to see the temperature of the cargo container throughout the shipping process.” In such a scenario, shipments would be outfitted with RFID tags and sensors that could record temperature, location, and any number of other statistics that could be reported back to the distributed ledger.

"It is a single source of truth that can be shared among all parties that could be applied to a lot of different industries,” Haswell said of blockchain technology.

"When all participants in an interaction have an up-to-date ledger that reflects the most recent transactions or changes, this allows organizations to cut out intermediaries and settle contracts or transactions much faster," Haswell added. "Speed, visibility, and having an immutable record are the primary business reasons blockchain could make sense in some industry applications."

IBM also reported that it has contributed significant resources to developing standards for blockchain use with Hyper Ledger, an open-source Linux Foundation Collaborative Project. Although the IBM spokesperson declined to comment on how much money IBM has put toward the effort, the company did note that it devoted 35 researchers and software engineers to writing 44,000 lines of code for the Hyper Ledger project.
http://arstechnica.com/business/2016...oney-transfer/
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Old 12-08-2016, 03:19 PM   #1083
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So BTC is close to $800 right now.

I've been sitting on a stash for a few years, thinking of selling some. What say OT?

I have an account with coinbase too and the feds are trying to get all their user info, so that makes me nervous. **** the IRS

Sell or let it continue to rise? Also, people are saying it will continue to go up under Drumpf. Maybe I'll just sell like half or something... decisions...
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Old 12-08-2016, 03:59 PM   #1084
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BTC-your username-the afro of your kid-Drumpf phoned with Duterte...

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Old 12-08-2016, 04:08 PM   #1085
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Quote:
Originally Posted by torquemada View Post
BTC-your username-the afro of your kid-Drumpf phoned with Duterte...
lol wut
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Old 12-08-2016, 05:02 PM   #1086
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How much of a "stash"? Less than ten, hundreds?

I only have 4 left >< Sold some before they skyrocketed into the hundreds...

I'm holding off to see if they just blow up into the thousands. Too many times so far in life I've wished to go back and do something different, this will be that one time I'm right on my own.

ibdumassujustjinxedit
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Old 12-08-2016, 05:08 PM   #1087
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I just went ahead and sold 2, still got some. I'll see where things are after Trump is sworn in.
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Old 12-08-2016, 05:27 PM   #1088
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Thanks for the heads up re: coinbase, too. Did some reading on that, on Dec 1 a SF judge already approved the ruling, so it's currently being fought, but pretty scary outcome.

I haven't done actual selling through coinbase at least, it's just where my miners deposit. There may be headlines of people owing thousands in unclaimed income tax.
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Old 12-27-2016, 09:55 AM   #1089
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Not sure this should be in the Bitcoin thread or the gold thread.


http://business.financialpost.com/fp...l-gold-at-mint

Quote:
Gold-backed digital payment platform to store physical gold at Mint

Goldmoney Inc., a gold payment and savings platform that aims to allow people to use gold as a currency, has added the Royal Canadian Mint to its storage network. Beginning Wednesday, users of Goldmoney’s blockchain technology will be able to purchase reserved physical gold in the Mint’s Ottawa vault, in increments as small as 35 cents. Goldmoney will charge a fee of 0.5 per cent, and buyers won’t be charged a storage fee for up to 1,000 grams of gold. Before the deal with the Mint, The Brink’s Co. was the sole storage and clearinghouse on the Goldmoney network, transferring gold between buyer and seller.
Related

The network, which boasts more than 1.3 million user signups in more than 150 countries, can also be used to send gold title via text message or email, or redeem gold balances to a prepaid Mastercard or bank account in local currency. Josh Crumb, one of the founders and chief strategy officer of Goldmoney, which was formerly known as BitGold when it launched in 2015, says the Mint will act as a custodian for storage and verifier of the physical gold for now. But there are plans for further talks between the Toronto-based startup and the Crown Corporation. “We look forward to working together with the Mint to explore educational co-marketing activities that aim to boost awareness and accessibility of precious metals,” Crumb said.

Officials at the Mint said it is early days to discuss what the initiatives might look like beyond providing highly secure storage services at vaults in Ottawa. But John Moore, vice-president of sales, said the emphasis would be on demonstrating Canada’s leadership role in the global precious metal industry. The Mint has dipped a toe into digital currencies before. In 2012, as Bitcoin was taking off, the Crown Corporation hatched the idea of building a digital cash platform. The technology, dubbed MintChip, was developed and eventually tested as a means to transfer cash digitally between two parties with no intermediary. But last January, before it got beyond the testing phase, Mintchip was sold to Toronto payments firm nanoPay.

Government-owned coin-producers and exchange marketplaces around the world are exploring and experimenting in the digital universe. The United Kingdom’s state-owned Royal Mint, for example, has teamed up with exchange operator CME Group to build a gold market using blockchain, or distributed ledger, technology. It is expected to be operational in the middle of next year, according to media reports.
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Old 01-01-2017, 10:44 PM   #1090
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$1,008.00
http://www.coindesk.com/price/

Regretting not getting in earlier, this is like real estate though right Up! Up! Up! That's the only direction it goes
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Old 01-01-2017, 11:03 PM   #1091
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pohenegamook View Post
$1,008.00
http://www.coindesk.com/price/

Regretting not getting in earlier, this is like real estate though right Up! Up! Up! That's the only direction it goes
Geebus. I really only monitor it while at work. Breaking 1K again is pretty freaking huge.

So tempting to dump....
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Old 01-02-2017, 01:21 PM   #1092
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Thanks India and China.
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Old 01-02-2017, 02:31 PM   #1093
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So is mining these things actually worth it now or not? I haven't really kept up with it.
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Old 01-03-2017, 11:25 AM   #1094
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Quote:
Originally Posted by etothen View Post
Justin80, failing since Jun 2005

So, on another note, have people figured out that bitcoins are worthless and a dumb idea yet?
Yes, so much that I sold a good chunk of mine today that I've been holding since 2014.
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Old 01-03-2017, 11:29 AM   #1095
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwx View Post
So is mining these things actually worth it now or not? I haven't really kept up with it.
Now? not really... not without a specific($$) rig

Several years ago? Hells yea
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Old 01-03-2017, 06:19 PM   #1096
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pohenegamook View Post
Now? not really... not without a specific($$) rig

Several years ago? Hells yea
Or if you have access to free electricity, like a dorm room or at work. Still very slow going, though, relative to just a couple years ago.
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Old 05-22-2017, 11:58 AM   #1097
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Quote:
Bitcoin prices are soaring under Trump

Digital currency bitcoin is more popular than ever. Prices surged to a record high above $2,000 over the weekend and were trading above $2,100 on Monday.

Just in 2017, bitcoin prices have soared 125%.
And traders can probably thank President Trump for at least part of the big spike.

Last week, markets were rocked after reports about former FBI director James Comey's memo about being asked by Trump to stop an investigation of former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn's ties to Russia.
Stocks plunged due to rising levels of uncertainty about Trump's ability to get anything meaningful accomplished as he deals with this crisis. And the US dollar weakened too. But bitcoin (XBT) is a beneficiary of this turmoil. So is gold.

One of the reasons digital currencies like bitcoin and lesser known ones such as Ethereum and Ripple have soared this year is because they, like gold, are not backed by governments. Bitcoins are tracked in a public online record known as the blockchain.

There are a finite number of bitcoins that can be "mined" -- that is, made available after a complex math problem is solved. And even though the record of transactions is public, there is a level of anonymity about who is making the transactions.

Bitcoin prices have tended to pop over the past few years at times of geopolitical uncertainty -- and especially when there were significant questions or concerns about the health of a major country's paper currency.
Trump has already talked about wanting the dollar to be weaker to help make the products of big US multinationals more competitive overseas. So that may be helping to lift the price of bitcoin.

The president also has some known bitcoin bulls in his administration as well.
His budget director, former US House member Mick Mulvaney, had been dubbed the "Bitcoin Congressman" by some of the currency's backers.

And vice president Mike Pence's chief economist Mark Calabria has given speeches in support of bitcoin as well. Calabria was formerly the director of financial regulation studies at the libertarian-leaning Cato Institute before joining the administration.

Many experts also think President Trump's fiscal spending plans could be highly inflationary. That could further weaken the dollar and fuel the rise in bitcoin and gold prices.

But concerns about just what Trump will actually be able to accomplish in the wake of the Comey allegations are another big reason for the dollar's recent slide and accompanying rise in bitcoin.

There is even some speculation about whether or not Trump's presidency could end prematurely due to him resigning, being impeached, or removed via the 25th Amendment of the US Constitution.

Add it all up and it appears that bitcoin prices could continue to climb higher. But some are worried that the party could end soon.
I asked my followers on Twitter what they thought was next for bitcoin.
Several expressed concerns that prices will come tumbling down since bitcoin has been an extremely volatile investment over the past few years. When bitcoin topped the $1,000 level in January, it was the first time it had done so in three years.

Those are great points. It is debatable whether bitcoin can ever become a mainstream form of payment. Just look at how little money the hackers behind the recent WannaCry ransomware made by demanding payment in bitcoin.

But Ross Gerber, CEO of investment firm Gerber Kawasaki and a frequent guest on CNNI's business programs, noted that bitcoin may be the perfect currency for these crazy and tumultuous times.

In other words, bitcoin and its smaller digital currency siblings could continue to benefit from all the turmoil in Washington.
$2k
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Old 05-22-2017, 12:26 PM   #1098
KoalaSlim
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I'm actively removing money from traditional investments and moving it into various crypto currencies. It's a solid hedge against coming uncertain times, and potential recession. I've been buying Ether, Litecoin and Bitcoin.

Quote:
Originally Posted by etothen View Post
$2k
Some estimates have future value at $250k

Last edited by KoalaSlim; 05-22-2017 at 01:08 PM.
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Old 05-29-2017, 12:22 AM   #1099
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It's been an entertaining week
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Old 05-29-2017, 01:35 AM   #1100
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At 2100 now. Peaked at like 2800 wed or something.

I went to log into cryptsy where I had a very small amount of coin, and the site is down and it's under an investigation and class action lawsuit.

Coinbase is one of the big online wallets and exchanges, but I wouldn't trust anything online now that the price has ballooned. They're all targets for hacks.

Look into offline/cold storage, it's actually pretty easy. Use an online wallet for temporary transactions, and move things into a paper wallet. There's just too much money involved with it now to trust anything online.
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