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Old 09-19-2016, 09:21 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default All-New Jeep Compass Breaks Cover




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This is the all-new Jeep Compass and this is the vehicle which has Fiat Chrysler Australia rolling-out the red carpet at the Los Angeles Auto Show in November.

These images, captured by Brazilian motoring site Autoo, catch the new Compass undergoing promotional photography ahead of making its official debut.



With sales of the mid-size Jeep Cherokee and full-size Grand Cherokee both stalling, FCA is looking for a boost when the all-new Compass hits the showrooms mid-2017, arriving to fil the shoes of both the current Compass, and the similarly-sized Patriot.

We like the front-end look which is very much a ‘mini-Grand Cherokee’ and while there is the hallmark upward shift of the window line near the C-pillar, the rear-end seems to take Jeep’s styling in a new direction.




Earlier spy photos of camouflaged prototypes showed an all-new interior for the Compass which was also heavily influenced by the Grand Cherokee including the familiar Uconnect central screen. And that’s a good thing as the Cherokee has a great interior wheras the current Compass... well, isn’t so great.

Expect the all-new Cherokee to sit on an expanded version of FCA’s ‘Small Wide 4x4’ platform as used in the Renegade and Fiat 500X.


The current Jeep Compass

North American media reports speculate power coming from either a turbocharged 2.0-litre engine or a naturally-aspirated 2.4-litre.
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Old 09-19-2016, 09:25 AM   #2
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That actually looks decent.
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Old 09-22-2016, 03:01 AM   #3
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It's actually good looking.
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Old 09-22-2016, 10:56 AM   #4
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Much improved visually. Scaled down grand Cherokee is not a bad idea.
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Old 09-22-2016, 11:26 AM   #5
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They ride and drive pretty well too. Same AWD system as the Renegade. Rather impressive during a recent Moab development trip.
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Old 09-22-2016, 02:15 PM   #6
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Looks like terrible visibility to me..
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Old 09-22-2016, 04:52 PM   #7
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Much better than the old version and the current Cherokee.
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Old 09-26-2016, 05:25 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by AVANTI R5 View Post
the front looks like a Forester SH with a different grill
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Old 09-26-2016, 06:42 PM   #9
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It looks great. I just hope it is a great vehicle. A mini Cherokee SRT8 would be awesome.
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Old 09-27-2016, 01:37 AM   #10
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Something about it reminds me of an M-B GLA with Jeep styling applied.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:05 AM   #11
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All-New Jeep Compass Breaks

- and I'm done here.
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Old 09-27-2016, 12:30 PM   #12
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I like the looks a lot.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:14 PM   #13
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I had a renegade limited rental and it was one of the worst cars I have had. The 4cyl was pathetic and the thing was a rattlebox at 15k miles. The Durango I had the previous rental was excellent however. It seems with Chrysler products, if you aren't in their higher end stuff, they suck.
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Old 09-27-2016, 02:17 PM   #14
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That C pillar is huge. Must be fun turning around and trying to look out the back.
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Old 02-25-2017, 09:59 PM   #15
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Old 02-26-2017, 08:15 AM   #16
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2017 Jeep Compass

Better than before, and that's no backhanded compliment.

Feb 2017 By GREG FINK

For some, saying goodbye is easier said than done. Just ask Jeep. Despite the arrival of this all-new, second-generation 2017 Jeep Compass crossover SUV, the brand will keep selling the first-generation Compass also as a 2017 model before sending that decade-old ute to the great scrap heap in the sky. Consumers may be confused. We, however, are happy to bid adieu to the lackluster first-generation Compass, as well as its boxier twin, the Jeep Patriot.

Like its predecessor and short-term stablemate, the new Compass fits into the 15.4-inch overall-length gap between Jeep’s wee Renegade and its midrange Cherokee crossovers. (If this hair-splitting strategy seems a bit odd, know that the Compass also is intended to serve as a volume seller in many global markets for which the Cherokee is simply too large.) Unlike the sad-sack first-generation Compass, though, the redesigned crossover looks and feels like it belongs on the same showroom floor with those rigs. Built on the “small-wide 4x4 architecture” that underpins the bug-eyed Renegade, the new Compass doubles down on the mini–Grand Cherokee looks that the original Compass tried to adopt in its 2011-model-year refresh. The new one is more handsome and better proportioned, with its slab sides complemented by an attractive shoulder-line kick and a pseudo floating roof. The latter is painted a contrasting black on the $29,690 Trailhawk; the black-roof treatment also is available on the $25,390 Latitude and $30,090 Limited trim levels but not on the base $22,090 Compass Sport. As with most modern Jeeps, the Compass is liberally endowed with Easter eggs, including a molded-plastic gecko at the base of the windshield and an imprint of the Loch Ness Monster at the bottom of the rear window.

VIEW 77 PHOTOS


Inside, the new Compass supplants the old one’s low-rent interior with modern wares that recall the interiors of the costlier Jeep Cherokee and Grand Cherokee in both design and material quality. Brittle-feeling control stalks and door-panel switchgear, though, are shared with the cheaper Renegade. Replacing the old Compass’s dated multimedia systems are a trio of Uconnect touchscreen units that measure 5.0, 7.0, and 8.4 inches, the largest also available with navigation. As with the Uconnect systems found in other Fiat Chrysler products, the 8.4-inch unit we played with was quick to respond to touch inputs and easy to use. A handful of hard buttons located near the HVAC controls ensures that even the least tech-savvy operators can complete basic multimedia commands.

Big Foot(print)

At 173.0 inches long, the new 2017 Compass overshadows the Renegade by 6.4 inches. An additional 2.6 inches between the Compass’s axles imbues the crossover with 3.2 inches more rear legroom than its smaller sibling. More impressive is the 27 cubic feet of cargo volume behind the 60/40 split-folding rear bench seat, which bests the larger Cherokee by two cubes.

The enlarged footprint also bestows the crossover with a more refined ride quality that doesn’t embarrass the little Jeep dynamically when you give it the whip. Over pockmarked and twisting back roads near Hollister, California, the Compass felt secure and composed thanks to its relatively limited body roll and appropriately weighted, if aloof, steering. Brake dive was minimal, although the brake pedal proved touchy.

VIEW 77 PHOTOS


All Compasses use FCA’s 2.4-liter inline-four producing 180 horsepower and 175 lb-ft of torque, an engine that’s also available in the Renegade. A six-speed manual gearbox is standard on the Sport and the all-wheel-drive Latitude. Two automatic transmissions are offered: a six-speed for front-wheel-drive models and a nine-speed with all-wheel drive. Both the off-road-ready Trailhawk and top-of-the-line Limited trim levels have the all-wheel-drive/nine-speed-automatic drivetrain as standard, and that’s the combination we sampled. Although the engine’s weak top end and the transmission’s hesitancy to downshift meant the Compass labored to pass traffic at highway speeds, the powertrain was a fine companion at slower paces. Relatively short lower gears in the nine-speed help the Compass feel eager off the line. Still, don’t bank on it being particularly speedy; consider that the quickest Jeep Renegade we’ve tested with this engine yielded a zero-to-60-mph time of 8.8 seconds while a heavier, off-road-oriented Renegade Trailhawk needed 9.2.

Rock with Me

With 8.5 inches of ground clearance (0.3 inch more than other all-wheel-drive Compass models), the Trailhawk has an impressive 30.3-degree approach angle, 24.4-degree breakover angle, and a 33.6-degree departure angle, improvements over the standard configuration by 13.5, 1.5, and 1.9 degrees. Further distinguishing the Trailhawk from other Compass variants are its knobby Falken Wildpeak H/T tires, underbody skid plates, and Jeep’s Active Drive Low all-wheel-drive system with a 4.33:1 final-drive ratio that features an overall—and low-range-like—first-gear ratio of 20.4:1.

VIEW 77 PHOTOS


While other all-wheel-drive Compass models provide standard Auto, Snow, Sand, and Mud driving modes, the Trailhawk adds a Rock mode. Among other things, Rock mode increases the sensitivity of the all-wheel-drive system’s brake-based torque vectoring. At Hollister Hills State Vehicular Recreation Area, the Trailhawk proved its mettle clambering over jagged rocks and slogging through muddy pits with relative ease. Although Rock mode never felt necessary for the obstacles we encountered, engaging it did noticeably reduce wheelslip.

If the Jeep Renegade is just a hair too small and the Cherokee a smidge too big, then the new Compass is sized just right. No longer a penalty box, the second-generation Compass combines mature looks, nimble handling, and comfortable accommodations, making it a worthy addition to Jeep’s small-crossover litter.

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http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/...t-drive-review
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Old 02-26-2017, 08:17 AM   #17
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First Drive: 2017 Jeep Compass

Cut-rate no more

By: Aaron Gold | Photography by: The Manufacturer February 23, 2017
HOLLISTER, California — As I watched the 2017 Jeep Compass Trailhawk ahead of me start down Truck Hill, I began to wonder if I should have stopped by the outhouse before heading for the trails. The Compass turned sharply, dropped its left-front wheel into a rut, lifted its right-rear paw high into the air, and pointed its rump towards the sky. Then it dropped like an elevator and disappeared from my sight.

A gentleman in a Jeep jacket pointed at me ominously.

“You’re next,” he said.

Jeep had brought a small group of hacks out to the Hollister Hills off-road area in Northern California to remind us that the all-new Compass is a proper Jeep, apparently deciding that the most expedient way to do this was to send us down a hill steep enough to evacuate the bowels of even the most hard-core off-roader. It seems a sensible move, considering that few people consider the outgoing Compass to be a proper SUV, let alone a proper Jeep.

Surely, you are familiar with the Compass: The second-to-last remnant of the Bad Old Days at Chrysler, it is a not-distant-enough relative of the horrid Dodge Caliber. Together with its smaller and slightly inferior sibling, the Patriot, it comprises the low-end of the Jeep lineup — and the two of them sell like hotcakes. Jeep moved more than 192,000 Compasses and Patriots in 2016, just over half the annual sales of the market-leading Honda CR-V. Keep in mind that these two forgettable vehicles are some of the oldest vehicles in Fiat-Chrysler’s American lineup. That should give you some indication of the demand for cheap Jeeps.

2017 Jeep Compass Trailhawk front view
The all-new 2017 Jeep Compass represents a shuffle in the Jeep lineup, as it is no longer the cut-rate Jeep. Instead, it slots between the Renegade and the Cherokee, with the former taking over as Jeep’s entry-level SUV. (The Patriot will die and no one will go to its funeral).

Between the Cherokee and the Renegade, Jeep has pretty well convinced me that they can make their transverse-engine platforms rock-crawl with the best of ‘em. Like its siblings, 4×4 Compasses have a four-mode all-wheel-drive system (Auto, Snow, Sand and Mud); the Trailhawk I drove adds a rock-crawling mode, hill descent control, a low range with a 20:1 crawl ratio, and chinless bumpers that improve approach and departure angles. Given the Compass’ tendency to lift a wheel over uneven terrain — an independent suspension only gives you so much wheel articulation — it relies on the brakes to grab any spinning wheels, airborne or not, which forces the differential to send power to the other side of the axle. Jeep says this can happen in as little as 1/8th of a wheel revolution when the system is in Rock mode.

As an off-roader, the new Compass works exceptionally well, though it’s a different style of off-road driving than one might employ in a Wrangler. I learned to off-road on old-school 4x4s: Put it in gear, let the clutch in as quickly as you can, then put your feet flat on the floor and let the machinery do the work. (I still remember a gruff northern Englishman instructing me on my first steep descent: “Doon’t touch the gas, doon’t touch the clootch, and for God’s sake, doon’t touch the brakes.”)

In the Compass, the methodology is gas-it-and-go: When forward motion ceases, you give it a little more accelerator, then wait for the AWD system to sort out where the traction is. It may take the Compass a second to get its footing, but it always seems to march forward; if it doesn’t, you just feed in a little more throttle. It’s so good that you can easily forget the engine is installed sideways.

We put hill descent control to the test on a pair of steep inclines, including the aforementioned Truck Hill, a deceptively innocent-looking drop that the OHV maps mark as “difficult” — as in “it is difficult to reconcile the actions of a sane person with those of someone willing to drive straight down the side of a sandy mountain.”

“Gas it a bit if it gets squirrelly,” advised the man in the Jeep jacket, but squirrely was never a problem: The Compass kept its footing and tip-toed down the hill. A Range Rover couldn’t have done the job any better. Personally, I’m really impressed at the engineering brainpower that can get such credible off-road performance from such a humble mechanical bits — either that, or the rest of the automotive industry is just really, really lazy.

From an engineering perspective, the new Compass is pretty much what you would expect. It is based on the same “small wide” platform as the Renegade, Cherokee, and Fiat 500X, its suspension employing MacPherson struts up front and Chapman struts (basically MacPhersons without steering capability) out back.

Design-wise, the Compass draws strongly on the “baby Grand Cherokee” theme of its predecessor, though the “shark fin” D-pillar is a nice little nod to the outgoing Compass. Inside, the Compass uses roughly the same dashboard layout as the Renegade, though it takes itself far more seriously. Soft-touch materials and high-quality trim pervade, and there are fewer playful details, although the whole shebang doesn’t feel quite as high-zoot as the Cherokee. The Compass is about half a foot longer than the Renegade, with a corresponding increase in rear-seat legroom and cargo space.

The US-market Compass comes with Fiat-Chrysler’s 2.4 liter “Tigershark” engine tuned for 180 horsepower and 175 lb-ft of torque. Automatic 4x4s get Chrysler’s much-maligned ZF-sourced nine-speed, while front-drivers get a six-speed. Like the Renegade, the Compass also can be had with a six-speed manual in either 4×2 or 4×4 form. (Praise be!)

All of the Compasses I drove were 4x4s with the nine-speed automatic, and acceleration felt just okay — not sluggish, not particularly quick, but definitely noisy. Chrysler is continuing to tweak the nine-speed transmission and the Jeep engineers present at our press preview repeatedly reminded us that we were driving pre-production vehicles that were still being calibrated. For the most part, the transmission behaved about as well as it ever does; upshifts were prompt, if not always smooth, but part throttle downshifts required very deliberate prodding of the accelerator. EPA fuel economy estimates go as high as 23/32 mpg city/highway for the manual front-driver, and the automatic 4x4s I drove are rated at 22/30.

Along with the Sport, Latitude, and Limited models, the Compass comes in the aforementioned Trailhawk edition, which comes with a raised ride height, more aggressive tires, and the trademark red tow hooks. (Jeep staffers openly acknowledged the irony that the chief spotting feature of their most rugged off-roaders is the bit you use to pull it free when its gets stuck.)

How is it on pavement? The Compass’ road manners, like its design, are more mature than the Renegade’s; it feels more buttoned down and not quite so playful. I wasn’t crazy about the steering; as you move off center, it responds too slowly, then too quickly, like a security guard that has been caught napping. Straight-line stability is good and it turns out that the best way to drive the Compass down the freeway is to keep your hands off the wheel.

2017 Jeep Compass Trailhawk rear side
I was impressed by the ride: The amplitude-reactive dampers that the Jeep engineers bragged about really do work. The suspension refused to be distracted from its assigned duties, and not even badly broken pavement could disturb the suspension’s ability to absorb impacts smoothly. Handling, like acceleration, is just okay: The Compass grips nicely and controls body motions well, but it carves the corners without much joy, as if it was closing its eyes and thinking of England.

It should come as no surprise that Jeep has priced the Compass right between the Renegade and the Cherokee. The basic Sport 4×4 lists for $22,090 (including a $1,095 destination fee) and the Limited 4×4 goes for $30,090 plus options; the Latitude and Trailhawk models fill the spaces between them. That seems like a fair price for all you get, but it might be a bit of a shock to buyers used to $20,000 Compasses and $18,000 Patriots. (The cheapest Jeep is now the entry-level Renegade, which lists for $18,990.)

The two Compasses will exist side-by-side, at least for a while; Jeep plans to sell both the old and new models as 2017 models — and just how much confusion do you think that will cause? Make sure you get the new one; if you can’t tell them apart, just drive down a steep, sandy, rutted hill. If you make it to the bottom without wrecking the car or soiling yourself, you’ve got the right 2017 Jeep Compass.

2017 Jeep Compass Specifications

ON SALE Spring 2017
PRICE $22,090
ENGINE 2.4L DOHC 16 I-4/180 hp @ 6,400 rpm, 175 lb-ft @ 3,900 rpm
TRANSMISSION 6-speed manual, 6-speed automatic (FWD), 9-speed automatic (4WD)
LAYOUT 4-door, 5-passenger, front-engine, FWD/4WD SUV
EPA MILEAGE 22-23/28-30 mpg (city/hwy)
L x W x H 173.0 x 73.8 x 64.6 in
WHEELBASE 103.8 in
WEIGHT 3,184-3,633 lb
0-60 MPH N/A
TOP SPEED N/A
Automobile mag
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Old 02-26-2017, 08:20 AM   #18
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http://www.fourwheeler.com/vehicle-r...ght-direction/
2017 JEEP COMPASS FIRST DRIVE - THE RIGHT DIRECTION


2017 JEEP COMPASS TRAILHAWK FIRST DRIVE: COMPASS FINALLY FINDS SOME DIRECTION

http://www.motortrend.com/cars/jeep/...nds-direction/

First Drive: 2017 Jeep Compass
http://www.freep.com/story/money/car...-suv/98278492/
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Old 02-27-2017, 10:24 AM   #19
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I like the looks of it.

If I could get the saddle brown interior, manual tranny, and AWD together I would be sold.
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Old 02-27-2017, 04:12 PM   #20
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well, I went through the configurator and you can get manual trans and AWD together. You have to choose a charcoal or a sort of light gray color for interior, cloth only (latitude package for manual trans). I'd say that's good enough.
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Old 02-28-2017, 10:38 AM   #21
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tempted to buy but it just seems so small even though it has more cargo room than the cherokee. would definitely get awd manual to stay away from that dreaded 9 speed
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Old 02-28-2017, 11:11 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by shake-rattle-n-roll View Post
tempted to buy but it just seems so small even though it has more cargo room than the cherokee. would definitely get awd manual to stay away from that dreaded 9 speed
manual only available on FWD models
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Old 02-28-2017, 11:27 AM   #23
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manual only available on FWD models
Incorrect. The limiting factor is if the vehicle is configured with the start/stop engine, not drive. Those without start/stop can be Manuals. Sport & Latitude can be had in 4x4 6MT. The Trailhawk and Limited are only 9AT, because it has the Start/Stop engine only (optional on Sport/Latitude).

--kC
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Old 02-28-2017, 11:44 AM   #24
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Incorrect. The limiting factor is if the vehicle is configured with the start/stop engine, not drive. Those without start/stop can be Manuals. Sport & Latitude can be had in 4x4 6MT. The Trailhawk and Limited are only 9AT, because it has the Start/Stop engine only (optional on Sport/Latitude).

--kC
Thanks for the clarification.
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