Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Thursday August 5, 2021
Home Forums Images WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
Click here to visit TireRack
Brakes & Suspension Forum sponsored by The Tire Rack

Losing traction? Need new tires?
Click here to visit the NASIOC Upgrade Garage...
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Brakes, Steering & Suspension

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.







* As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads. 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-30-2014, 02:57 AM   #1
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default Stock suspension bottoms out all the time 2011 WRX

Wow. I thought Subaru improved the 2011 WRX suspension. It's terrible. It's bottoming out on me all the time... just on regular driving. Thwuump thwuump. I can feel the foam of the bump stops doing their job. How is this possible? The compression valving seems WAAAY too soft.

I checked for leaks and didn't find any. The suspension is not wildly and uncontrollable jumping up and down. It just seems that this is the way the stock suspension is.

The 2011 WRX is supposed to be a 217/194 ft/in rate which is very close to the SPT pinks I ran on my previous 06 WRX. Yet it feels softer. And totally underdamped; particularly on the compression stroke. Even little clues like going 3 mph over a 5 mph speed bump bottoms out the front.

Is everyone else with a 2009-2014 WRX bottom out all the time too?

Just a freeway on ramp will do it. My GTWORX Bilsteins can't get to me soon enough.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.

Last edited by chimchimm5; 11-07-2014 at 06:35 PM.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Old 08-30-2014, 08:24 PM   #2
yo vanilla
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 71903
Join Date: Oct 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: appleton, wi
Vehicle:
11 Audi A4 6MTQ
13 Mazda CX-5

Default

first off is this a new car for you, or have you had it a long time and it's a new occurance?
yo vanilla is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2014, 03:47 AM   #3
sc00by4life
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 97135
Join Date: Sep 2005
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Default

Unless you have blown struts, you're doing it wrong.



Sent from my iPhone using NASIOC
sc00by4life is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 12:27 AM   #4
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by yo vanilla View Post
first off is this a new car for you, or have you had it a long time and it's a new occurance?
Bought it used and have had it for about a month. Struts do not show signs of leaking or excessive wheel movement associated with blown struts.

It just feels under damped. Severely under damped.

I used to have a 2006 WRX with almost identical spring rates but with adjustable struts. I've spent a lot of time finding the right settings so I've felt under and over damped. This is definitely in the under damped region. Freeway transition points cause it to oscillate a few times. I'm able to reduce the effect by "absorbing" the bump with right foot modulating the gas. But this is the behavior I expect out of my Honda minivan, not a WRX.

The minivan btw doesn't bottom out like the 2011 WRX stock suspension does. Example: driving down the street and then turning left into a parking lot. The little driveway transition (even when taken at the smooth angle) will bottom out unless I slow to a low rider crawl.

To clarify, I'm not talking about rut hitting mallet-wacking-the-chassis thumps type of bottoming out. I'm talking about fully compressing the foam bumpstop and small thump of an easy bottom out. This just screams under damped.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 02:06 AM   #5
Back Road Runner
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 60082
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minnesota
Vehicle:
2004 Forester STI
Silver

Default

I feel if you've gone aftermarket and went back stock with most cars, most will feel under damped and soft or at least a little bottom out happy. It wouldn't be so bad if there was a ton of bump stroke to play with, but I'm not sure how little the stock setup has. I haven't exactly seen people praise suspension travel on any of these newer generations.

Even on older gens it's not necessarily amazing. I have some (I've been told...) STI springs (of some form) on WRX struts. The high rebound keeps the thing from bounding after bumps, but even with what's pretty much stock ride height for an STI, it bottoms out over everything. Most aren't aware that the feeling they get is actually that rather than what they often incorrectly guess as firm damping. It really isn't until you step to a suspension setup that doesn't bottom out that you realize how much these stock and basically any sport spring setups out there do...like over everything. Even stiffer setups like RCE Blacks that so many love are still too low and bottom out over half the stuff you drive over. It's silly. Outside of running Forester springs or something actually tall, there really isn't a fix outside of grabbing a Ground Control coilover kit and finally getting some preload adjustment to dial in some functional bump travel. Otherwise it's bottom out city, population you.

There's still always aftermarket, and there's enough for coilover kits available to get decent results as long as the coilover has enough stroke, the rates are reasonably soft, and the preload is set high enough to have sizable bump travel. Then you're pretty golden.
Back Road Runner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 03:14 AM   #6
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

Thanks for the reply BRR... I have the GTWORX Bilsteins on order.

And I'm pairing them with King lift springs (3/4" lift front, 1" lift rear... although I'm asking the shop to adjust the rear perch down 5mm so it's more like a 3/4", 3/4" lift. I don't want to operate too far out of the originally designed zone and its dynamic toe rate.

I'm very concerned that the "one size fits both" Bilstein will be significantly overdamped because the RCE yellows are 330/330. The blacks are 275/250 and the Kings are approximately ~260/210. However I was assured by the vendor that this combination has been done before and has worked well.

Unfortunately I'm at the mercy of what's available (or rather what's not available):
- GTWORX Bilsteins - awesome struts but valved for the wrong springs. Lowering springs do NOT work for me (rallyx)
- Feal inserts: best fit match but aren't available anymore.
- Koni inserts: awesome struts but the insert combo with dual tube is not rallyx friendly
- KYB AGX: ummm.... no. I've had these on a previous car an they were just ok. It worked. It was meh.
- Tokico D-specs: do they even make these for the 08-14 WRX?
- coilovers: doesn't work because I need setup it and forget it longevity. like 75k-100k longevity. Maintenance free. Free-ish.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 04:25 AM   #7
Back Road Runner
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 60082
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minnesota
Vehicle:
2004 Forester STI
Silver

Default

I've always viewed dampers, at least anything fixed or single adjustable, that there is one best setting only for any given spring/mass/damping setup. For a fixed damper, there is one best spring rate that will produce the best ride quality. For a single adjustable variable damper there is one setting on that damper for any given spring rate that produces the best ride for that spring rate choice. Even on double adjustable, there is still a best preference compression and best preference rebound setting for a given spring rate and a mix of the two that will give good total chassis control.

Maybe I'm picky.

The only way I've ever considered flexibility to work is with very soft rates where some variability of the damper doesn't exactly affect the end result tremendously because the forces and the motion speed are so low and slow. With stiffer springs, being off just a little bit tends to produce some rather annoying results with an annoyingly bouncy ride if soft or tire contact issues with bump or rebound being too high.

Companies are there to sell products, and I feel in cases like this they hope you aren't very picky with the end result. It can work very well for someone inexperienced as they may not know better or have little expectation of what it should be like or know what is actually good. I've toyed around with suspension enough that I would absolutely hate driving on a setup that isn't set just right. I'm spoiled enough now that I ride in some stock cars and laugh at the low damping, poor control, or excess wiggle (soft bushings) just because I am now so acutely aware of these things that it all bugs me.

You and rally-x will make for some interesting work. You will need suspension stroke first and foremost. I would also attempt to get a damping profile that works well for that use. I have no idea what the Blistein is like. I really liked the D-Specs for rally-x use, although I always wanted just a little more low speed compression damping for turn-in response and a kinked high speed just to soak up the big hits and washboard stuff just a little bit better rather than knocking up or shuttering the car. I've personally always looked at Feal inserts as the next step for me whenever the D-Specs would eventually fail on me (still haven't after a number of years). It's a shame the insert went away. Unfortunately the 441 isn't as rugged of a product. However, their 460 rally racing coilover may be very interesting if you have $2500 to plop down. It's available for 2008+ and offers longer stroke than stock.

On the cheap, I do kind of see Fortune Auto's 500 coilovers to be a reasonable choice. The damping is set well for high low speed but a heavy kink and soak up on anything bigger. The stroke is ok at I believe a little over 5", and the damping range is suitable for everything from stock STI rates on up to anything higher than you'd use. It'd probably feel pretty good on a soft setup close to STI rates, and just add enough preload to give yourself a good 3" of bump travel. I'm not sure how low the car would sit though, and that may be a problem depending on your venue. Maybe some lift blocks or saggy but spacers exist for the newer chassis that could bump the ride height back up so you're not plowing dirt.

I don't know your budget, but the Feal 460 coilovers would probably kick some serious butt if you've got the money to spend. They are non-adjustable, but cheaply rebuildable and likely can be valved however you want if you know what you like.
Back Road Runner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 12:56 PM   #8
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default Stock suspension bottoms out all the time 2011 WRX

Yes, the Feal 460 was my other choice. I would have spent the money to get them but the problem is that I do too much daily driving. Most of my life I don't have time to futz with stuff and I need the car to be an appliance. Hence my strong preference for strut based applications. Yet I'm still doing rallyx/autox/track for fun so I want a good setup. My Ohlins FPS setup got me through about 75k miles and was going strong and I was expecting it to last a LOT longer. I had to regrease the inverted struts once (and the state of the grease was still in pretty good condition). The only other time I pulled the suspension apart was to swap springs.

I agree that there is "one setting" (within a particular adjustable strut) that matches spring/strut. But as I found with the Ohlins was that there was a window of settings that still worked pretty darn well. Underdamped was horrible, but there was forgiveness in the overdamped direction. Mind you I'm saying +/-2 of 23 clicks on the Ohlins FPS. Once I narrowed into what I felt was the sweet spot, I noticed the -2 (underdamped) from that position was noticeable bouncy. But I could go as high as +4 (overdamped) before it started to feel like the car was being kicked up/down because the suspension was too stiff.

I think the Ohlins FPS helped me sensitize my suspension butt dyno.

Ok so back to the Bilsteins... clearly NOT a perfect match. I really wish they were adjustable (and so does Myles, IIRC). But they were the best available strut for this car. Aren't they revalvable by Feal? I really hope the vendor wasn't being overly hopeful and that this setup works out.

Last of all, and back on topic, I'm really surprised that Subaru chose to have such low damping on the struts. The spring rate, is not "soft"... after all it's the rate the GD STI came with. But I can't understand why they would have such soft struts. In contrast, I noticed that European cars (like BMW) tends to use higher damping, even with soft springs (looking at non-M3 BMW 3-series cars). (I do have the same bottom out complaint about the E46 BMW 330 but I blame it's short travel too soft front spring).

EDIT: I retract the "one" setting statement. While there's "approximately" one setting (actually a window of "setting) that is "best fit" for a particular application, there are just too many variances in applications to say there's one-size-fits-all even if the spring rate characteristic is constant.

Last edited by chimchimm5; 02-13-2015 at 02:35 PM.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 01:25 PM   #9
Back Road Runner
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 60082
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minnesota
Vehicle:
2004 Forester STI
Silver

Default

Spring rate is also about motion ratio, so it's not quite an apples to apples comparison when looking at older cars. Yeah, compression damping has historically been low, around 25%-30% of rebound meaning it's doing very little. Worse yet, the profile is also linear meaning low speed damping is quite low. ALL the chassis control is done via the rebound. The AGX struts are a good example. It's a strut that works good on soft suspension with a ton of bump travel, but sucks with stiff springs and anything lowered.

You're right about the forgiveness of damper settings. Under damped is bouncy, very bouncy on stiff springs. Over damped is...dependent. Too much compression and you're knocking the car up off the ground over bumps. Too much rebound and the suspension has trouble extending after a bump, and you get the feeling of free falling after every bump. Both cause traction loss. However up until this point you can have a well damped car with excellent chassis control and have a small range of settings to play with, but as you said, only a few clicks at most.

I have a feeling the Feal 460 would have been comfy enough for daily use, although I don't know how nice it would be for auto-x. Maybe some adjustable sways and a ride height tweak would be enough to jump between the two sports, not ideally but functionally. And with the rebuildability, I figure Feal could custom make the damping and spring rates however you want. Then you're simply buying into the quality and performance of the hardware package. The initial setup may be more hassle, but it'd probably be hard to match the end result with another product remotely close to the price, especially if Feal doesn't charge extra (or much extra) for the custom setup.

Are there shock dyno graphs of the Blistein. If so, the proper spring rates can be figured out, as well as expected ride behavior.
Back Road Runner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 02:21 PM   #10
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default Stock suspension bottoms out all the time 2011 WRX

No available shock dynos. I asked.

Myles said they designed the WRX strut to have "a low of low speed bump" and digressive. My understanding is that low speed bump will help with weight transfer control. And the side effect of that is higher bump damping overall (even with digression) which is what in looking for.

Yeah I know the motion ratio determines effective spring rate but the WRX fronts are both macphearson. Rear is different but not drastically different. Just estimating.


Sent from my iPhone using NASIOC

Last edited by chimchimm5; 09-01-2014 at 02:52 PM.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 03:06 PM   #11
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default Stock suspension bottoms out all the time 2011 WRX

I am also aware that shock dyno's "do not tell the whole story". They just give a clue to the "personality" of the shock and a clue as to which spring rate it would work with. They only graph the velocity vs force.

The position of compression of the spring has almost no relation to the velocity of the suspension. In a perfectly executed textbook turn, maybe. But not it all applications. I think this is what makes the whole idea of "60% critically damped" (or whatever the number is) purely a rule of thumb. There are very small windows of operation where this will be true even in matched systems.

I saw a few posts on autox'ers using these Bilsteins with stock springs. But autox is weird... they get to used these weird over the balance point setups because the application is so different.

As for the stock suspension, if only the Bilsteins came adjustable.... we could just keep the springs.

I saw one post about a JDM Bilstein setup that was for more like a "250/250" setup or something. Anyone know?

Last edited by chimchimm5; 09-01-2014 at 05:49 PM.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2014, 07:50 PM   #12
Robin2
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 390
Join Date: Oct 1999
Chapter/Region: E. Canada
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Vehicle:
2020 Forester Sport
Dark Grey

Default

Welcome to very sub par suspension. My old gc coupe rs even on stock crappy could outandle my 11wrx. I learned that at 1st autox 3 years ago. Not even on sticky tires and bottom out. Front end is very loose / bracing is min

Now on koni yellow and epic springs. Its OK overall. And don't bottom out anymore. Now can 3rd attempt to get rid of front control arm bushing. OE to groupN to 11sti control arms to now going energy suspension bushings
Robin2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2014, 08:21 PM   #13
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

More complaints: the rebound is a lot higher than the compression and that makes the problem worse.

There's a speedbump in the parking lot at my work that I noticed works a lot like a bump in a rallyx. It's a 5mph speed bump, and the stock suspension just kills itself going over this speedbump at just the rated 5mph. Meanwhile Prius and Volvo's are skating over this bump at twice my speed.

Here's what happens:
- going 5 mph at the speedbump, the front hits the bump and softly compresses.
- as the front wheels are over the bump, all the energy stored in the front springs initial compression bounces the front up
- as the front goes over the back of the bump you feel/hear the suspension thump to full droop, and then the nose freefalls onto its foamy bump stops and bottoms out in a "giant wooden mallet" thump.
- the nose then oscillates 3-4 times before it settles
- going the Prius/volvo speed is even worse.
- the only way to controllably go over this bump is to crawl like a slammed car at 2 mph.

On a real rallyx, this behavior would feel like gremlins are whacking the chassis with wooden mallets throughout the whole course.

On a track or autox, this problem probably wouldn't be an issue. Although, sloshy weight transfer would be a complaint. My original test drive was ok, but there's only so much you can do safely on the street and within the confines of the test drive.

Honestly I don't understand why Subaru would design it this way. Add some more bump damping. That's it. It wouldn't make it uncomfortable because the factory struts feel so severely underdamped in compression.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2014, 09:05 PM   #14
RocSubie
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 386147
Join Date: Mar 2014
Default

I hated my stock suspension. I moved to raceland coilovers and love them
RocSubie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2014, 11:06 PM   #15
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

I was going to run the stock suspension just to try it at a rallyx in a few weeks but now I don't even want to waste the venue. (Other unrelated reasons too)

Ok.. Found that if I accelerate and then be on the brakes to do the nose stabilization technique as the front hits the bump and then back on gas as it lands after the bump I can avoid the bottom out. But that's a lot of pedal work to compensate.




Sent from my iPhone using NASIOC
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 02:13 AM   #16
Back Road Runner
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 60082
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minnesota
Vehicle:
2004 Forester STI
Silver

Default

Soft springs and soft damping, whatcha going to do?

You're still not as bad as old Audis. My god those cars are funny to watch around a rally-x course. The front end is just boing, boing, boing, and they just nose dive into the ground after every bump. It wasn't just one car. There's a few different models/years running, and they all do it, haha. I have yet to see a Subaru that bad.

I've also been really impressed with the 2011+ STI bone stock. Someone drives one local, and it's darn fast. He's a good driver too, but the car is moderately quicker than previous years. It's quite apparent. 2011 seemed to be the first year they got real quick after Subaru did some updates to that model to dial out some understeer and add more handling feeling to the car. Too bad the WRX didn't really get better suspension wise. I mean it was nice the wide body got tossed on and they upped the power over the years, but the suspension is still pretty much base Impreza soft and compliant. The performance difference in rally-x is sizable between the two cars, much more than older years.
Back Road Runner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 11:58 AM   #17
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Back Road Runner View Post
Soft springs and soft damping, whatcha going to do?

You're still not as bad as old Audis.
but is it soft springs? The 08 yes, but the 09+ have reasonably not too soft springs at 220/196.

You should see the Prius attack the same bump. That's definitely a soft spring. But the difference was the damper.

Quote:
I've also been really impressed with the 2011+ STI bone stock. ... 2011 seemed to be the first year they got real quick after Subaru did some updates to that model to dial out some understeer and add more handling feeling to the car. Too bad the WRX didn't really get better suspension wise. I mean it was nice the wide body got tossed on and they upped the power over the years, but the suspension is still pretty much base Impreza soft and compliant. The performance difference in rally-x is sizable between the two cars, much more than older years.

I'm guessing dialed out understeer was because of the 250f/290r springs. And the handling make extra "bettah" with smarter damper design.

Hmmm. So how does handling of the 08-10 STI compare to the 11-14 WRX since they have the same springs but different dampers?



Sent from my iPhone using NASIOC
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 12:14 PM   #18
Robin2
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 390
Join Date: Oct 1999
Chapter/Region: E. Canada
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Vehicle:
2020 Forester Sport
Dark Grey

Default

springs aren't the issue.... struts simply can't anything. racecomp eng. showed difference from 2009wrx to 2015wrx. shock dyno was way better on 15's compared to 09wrx shocks. 11's cant be that different from 09's.
Robin2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 02:10 PM   #19
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

Grabbed from the RXE '15 WRX/STI thread where Myles posted up the shock dyno. Yeah, that green line is exactly what my butt dyno is sensing and my fingers are bitching about in this thread.

chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 02:39 PM   #20
AndyRoo
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 20952
Join Date: Jul 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Baltimore, MD
Vehicle:
BRZ & Datsun
White & White

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chimchimm5 View Post
Thanks for the reply BRR... I have the GTWORX Bilsteins on order.

And I'm pairing them with King lift springs (3/4" lift front, 1" lift rear... although I'm asking the shop to adjust the rear perch down 5mm so it's more like a 3/4", 3/4" lift. I don't want to operate too far out of the originally designed zone and its dynamic toe rate.

I'm very concerned that the "one size fits both" Bilstein will be significantly overdamped because the RCE yellows are 330/330. The blacks are 275/250 and the Kings are approximately ~260/210. However I was assured by the vendor that this combination has been done before and has worked well.
For what it's worth...the GTWORX Bilsteins do have a lot of low speed compression and that should feel good with the softer King springs. Rebound isn't super aggressive in comparison so going with a softer spring than RCE Yellows wouldn't concern me much at all. I think that will be a solid rally-x (and DD) set-up.
AndyRoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 03:22 PM   #21
Back Road Runner
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 60082
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minnesota
Vehicle:
2004 Forester STI
Silver

Default

I'm not really sure why Subaru runs such linear damper profiles as they do, and because it's not kinked, they need to run the compression super soft as to not have big bumps so jarring. I won't deny. Stock is comfy. Unfortunately you a LOT of bump travel so the car doesn't bottom out over everything, aka why you shouldn't lower Subarus 101.
Back Road Runner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 03:34 PM   #22
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyRoo View Post
For what it's worth...the GTWORX Bilsteins do have a lot of low speed compression and that should feel good with the softer King springs. Rebound isn't super aggressive in comparison so going with a softer spring than RCE Yellows wouldn't concern me much at all. I think that will be a solid rally-x (and DD) set-up.
I hope so. I pulled the trigger on this because all the answers I could get from all the "blind men touching the elephant" seems to suggest this. The GTWORX Bilsteins have both higher low speed compression and a digressive profile... so I'm guess that this is the best available strut option for the Kings and my needs.

I'll report my findings. There's a bazillion reviews of these struts paired with all the lowering springs out there, but no reviews on them paired with Kings or even stock WRX springs. Or even stock '11-14 STI springs.

BTW, do struts usually have some internal bump stop that prevents them from damaging themselves at full droop/extention? Or is it assumed that the limiting factor at full droop is the spring?
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 03:40 PM   #23
MaddMax
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 9264
Join Date: Aug 2001
Vehicle:
2016 BMW M235i 6MT

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robin2 View Post
springs aren't the issue.... struts simply can't anything. racecomp eng. showed difference from 2009wrx to 2015wrx. shock dyno was way better on 15's compared to 09wrx shocks. 11's cant be that different from 09's.
...and yet the 2011-2014 WRX outhandles the last generation V8 M3 on the Streets of Willow with the same professional driver behind the wheel. Yeah, the OEM GR WRX suspension isn't great in terms of control, but the car is far from a wet noodle and pogoing disaster. With that said, I've got the GTWork RCE Blacks on my WRX now. It's nice and far more controlled. Yeah, it can bottom out on bad pavement, but even God's chariot, the 911 would bottom out on the same surfaces.
MaddMax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 05:59 PM   #24
chimchimm5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 88501
Join Date: Jun 2005
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: NorCal
Vehicle:
2011 WRX Hatch
Dark Grey

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaddMax View Post
...and yet the 2011-2014 WRX outhandles the last generation V8 M3 on the Streets of Willow with the same professional driver behind the wheel. Yeah, the OEM GR WRX suspension isn't great in terms of control, but the car is far from a wet noodle and pogoing disaster. With that said, I've got the GTWork RCE Blacks on my WRX now. It's nice and far more controlled. Yeah, it can bottom out on bad pavement, but even God's chariot, the 911 would bottom out on the same surfaces.
Heh I like that.

And the other part I like:

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaddMax View Post
the 2011-2014 WRX outhandles ...................With that said, I've got the GTWork RCE Blacks on my WRX now.

Last edited by chimchimm5; 09-03-2014 at 08:35 PM.
chimchimm5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-03-2014, 06:34 PM   #25
Robin2
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 390
Join Date: Oct 1999
Chapter/Region: E. Canada
Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Vehicle:
2020 Forester Sport
Dark Grey

Default

Lol at madmax. If I go to calabogie race track its ultra smooth pavement I barely complain. But go to my locol autox where winter is heaving every year the pavement and you'll see exactly what I'm talking about

I also love how caster changes with poor rear bushing design in on gr wrx.
Robin2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:45 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2021 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2019, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.