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Old 03-16-2017, 08:42 AM   #1
ZenerWing
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Member#: 464481
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Canton, OH
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2017 WRX
Pure Red

Default Winter Tires Questions

I am picking up my 2017 WRX today and I know it comes standard with the Summer tires, I live in Ohio and I drive fairly far to work (32 miles) is there enough winter left for me to purchase winter tires now or do you think I would be ok until the fall? I have never used winter tires previously, but on the same token, I have never used Summer only tires either. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
-Zenerwing
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Old 03-16-2017, 08:52 AM   #2
Minorthreat7171
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Member#: 288712
Join Date: Jul 2011
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Lancaster, PA
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2007 WRX IAP Stage2
WRB

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get good set of all seasons if you only have one set of wheels. If you have two sets just get the snow tires, then you'll have them for next winter.

I used a set of Hankook Ventus S1 NOBLE2's for two and a half years and they did alright in the snow as long as I didn't drive like an asshat.
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Old 03-16-2017, 09:38 AM   #3
AWD Freak
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ZenerWing View Post
I am picking up my 2017 WRX today and I know it comes standard with the Summer tires, I live in Ohio and I drive fairly far to work (32 miles) is there enough winter left for me to purchase winter tires now or do you think I would be ok until the fall? I have never used winter tires previously, but on the same token, I have never used Summer only tires either. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

-Zenerwing


Winter tires shouldn't be used close to freezing or where there is snow. You will be able to notice a difference when it starts getting below 40. You might feel find driving but you are better with a pair of ice skates when it comes to stopping.

Look at it this way, you just dropped 30k on a new car, why not get the right tire to protect it.
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Old 03-16-2017, 09:53 AM   #4
JRowland
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Location: Pittsburgh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AWD Freak View Post
Winter tires shouldn't be used close to freezing or where there is snow. You will be able to notice a difference when it starts getting below 40. You might feel find driving but you are better with a pair of ice skates when it comes to stopping.

Look at it this way, you just dropped 30k on a new car, why not get the right tire to protect it.
If funds are low you may be able to carefully and slowly make it out ok. You are right on the cusp, I'm ready to change mine back to summers but not quite yet. It's a tough call but you will need them eventually so if you can swing it do it now. The summers are hard and slick when it's cold (below 50 like our mornings are going to be for a little bit longer). If it snows again you're gonna be in trouble, and that's not improbable in March around here. 2 sets of tires and rims for me is the way to go, all seasons don't really do either great. Paying to mount and balance twice a year vs. doing it once and getting several years out of doing it myself appeals to me. Other benefits to 2 sets are 2 different looks to your car if you go with a different rim and less chance of someone scratching up your rims (you'll have enough opportunity to do that yourself). If funds are super tight buy some good all seasons and sell your summers to help offset the cost.
ETA: ask the dealer if they will swap some all seasons on it (again only if your funds are tight)
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Old 03-16-2017, 02:43 PM   #5
uofime
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Location: Chicago, NW suburbs
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The stock Dunlops are ok with cold, they're not as sticky as they would be when its warm, but they're no worse that cheap all seasons if its 20F and dry.
It is snow and ice they can't deal with at all, even a dusting of snow will have ABS going nuts and your stopping distances laughably long.
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Old 03-16-2017, 03:18 PM   #6
JRowland
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Originally Posted by uofime View Post
The stock Dunlops are ok with cold, they're not as sticky as they would be when its warm, but they're no worse that cheap all seasons if its 20F and dry.
It is snow and ice they can't deal with at all, even a dusting of snow will have ABS going nuts and your stopping distances laughably long.
I took this from Tire Rack's website:

Summer performance tires feature tread compounds engineered to provide traction in warm to hot ambient temperatures. They were never intended to experience near- and below-freezing temperatures, nor the wintry driving conditions that often accompany them.

As ambient temperatures get colder, typically in the 40-45 Fahrenheit range, summer performance tires lose a noticeable percentage of traction as their tread compound rubber properties change from a pliable elastic to inflexible plastic. The tire industry uses the term "glass transition" to describe the temperature where a summer performance tire's grip/slip performance changes dramatically. This means the summer performance tires that provide predictable traction in warm to hot conditions will be found to be very challenging to drive in cold to freezing temperatures. This is especially true when the tires first begin to be driven or if the driver aggressively applies gas pedal pressure with today's turbocharged fours or high-torque sixes and eights. Fortunately, glass transition is a reversible condition that allows the tires' normal traction to return as the ambient temperatures climb.

If ambient temperatures drop to near- or below-freezing, driving or rolling a vehicle equipped with summer performance tires risks the possibility of tread compound cracking. Tread compound cracking is a permanent condition that requires the tires to be replaced. The other condition that can be caused by running summer performance tires in cold temperatures is the possibility of chipping away the edges of the tread blocks.

Since both of these conditions only occur as the result of what's considered improper use or storage, they are not typically covered by the manufacturer's warranty.

The no worse than cheap all seasons part isn't really correct.
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Old 03-16-2017, 05:35 PM   #7
bluE-d1ff
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Old 03-17-2017, 09:04 AM   #8
Rastarican718
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Agreed, I had some all seasons on my WRX when I first got it, did ok in the dry and wet, even when it was cold. But as soon as there was ice and snow? I was less than impressed, the AWD does help you not get stuck or when your setting off. But AWD doesn't do dick to help you turn or more importantly stop, after a few close calls with sliding under braking I bought Winter tires for my factory wheels and a summer set of wheels and tires.

I have them in my kitchen around my table that I never use lol Looking forward to finally putting them back on and going around corners at hooligan-istic speeds
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Old 03-17-2017, 02:10 PM   #9
uofime
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Location: Chicago, NW suburbs
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2015 WRX
Galaxy Blue Pearl

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JRowland View Post
I took this from Tire Rack's website:

Summer performance tires feature tread compounds engineered to provide traction in warm to hot ambient temperatures. They were never intended to experience near- and below-freezing temperatures, nor the wintry driving conditions that often accompany them.

As ambient temperatures get colder, typically in the 40-45 Fahrenheit range, summer performance tires lose a noticeable percentage of traction as their tread compound rubber properties change from a pliable elastic to inflexible plastic. The tire industry uses the term "glass transition" to describe the temperature where a summer performance tire's grip/slip performance changes dramatically. This means the summer performance tires that provide predictable traction in warm to hot conditions will be found to be very challenging to drive in cold to freezing temperatures. This is especially true when the tires first begin to be driven or if the driver aggressively applies gas pedal pressure with today's turbocharged fours or high-torque sixes and eights. Fortunately, glass transition is a reversible condition that allows the tires' normal traction to return as the ambient temperatures climb.

If ambient temperatures drop to near- or below-freezing, driving or rolling a vehicle equipped with summer performance tires risks the possibility of tread compound cracking. Tread compound cracking is a permanent condition that requires the tires to be replaced. The other condition that can be caused by running summer performance tires in cold temperatures is the possibility of chipping away the edges of the tread blocks.

Since both of these conditions only occur as the result of what's considered improper use or storage, they are not typically covered by the manufacturer's warranty.

The no worse than cheap all seasons part isn't really correct.
In generality, sure you shouldn't do it. I however waited until it actually snowed to put winter tires on my car the first year I had it and that meant that I drove it more than a little when it was quite cold outside, well below freezing. I can therefore tell you that this particular rubber formulation in these Dunlops will in fact not fall apart if you drive in the cold. That said when it was cold I wasn't driving in a manner that would promote that either.

So yes while all seasons may be more durable at that temperature, they don't really offer any more grip.

My point was, don't be afraid to drive the car just because it is cold. Countless people have, I know more than a couple of foolish people who have driven through multiple winters here in chicago on the summer tires, not that I am suggesting anyone do that, its a terrible idea, that said their tires didn't fall apart and they haven't died. Though I have seen a few in ditches when it snowed...
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Old 03-19-2017, 05:46 AM   #10
nomadicbohunk
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I don't think it's worth getting winter tires in a climate where it changes back and forth. Just decent all seasons. However, I don't go hot rodding around. DECENT all seasons. You've got to ask for the in warmer areas or from tire shops that aren't too great.

We get around all right in a little impreza in the snow and ice in when we visit the Nebraska sandhills. The roads don't really get cleared there very well.
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Old 03-19-2017, 11:00 PM   #11
Scooby Coupe
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Location: Blackberry Township, Illinois
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2017 WRX Premium
Dark Gray Metallica

Impreza WRX I had the same question

Zenerwing,

I took delivery of my WRX 12/29/16 and wondered the same thing. This has been an unusually snowless winter in northeastern Illinois and I lucked out. Only once have I felt my car lose traction on a slippery road. I have decided to wait until autumn 2017 to acquire winter tires and another set of wheels to mount them on.

Good luck with your new WRX!

Dave Wood
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:17 PM   #12
rexmaster
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Location: Lake County, IL
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2017 WRX Limited
CWP

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I used to have all season/snow combo sets and swapped them out around late March for my previous car. Personally, I would rather drive longer on snow tires for peace of mind and it's also cheaper to replace the snow tires (17") compared to the stock summer tires (18") for WRX.
I'm sticking with the average ambient temperature of 40F for unpredictable midwestern weather (snow shoes: <40F, summer shoes: >40F).

Last edited by rexmaster; 03-20-2017 at 09:16 PM.
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Old 03-20-2017, 07:40 PM   #13
tokksic
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Plenty of good advice here re: winter tires and summer tires, but to extrapolate on the all seasons... buy a GOOD set of all seasons if you're in Ohio. You'll have warm evenings but cold mornings. When I say good all seasons, I'd suggest an ultra high performance all season like BFGoodrich g-Force Comp 2 A/S. It won't really do too much for you in the snow, but will be way better than a summer tire. The dry grip in the warmth is VERY good, like low end summer tire good. This is what I would do if you can't afford two sets of tires/wheels. Any all season less than the BFG Comp 2, and you'll be mushy in corners.
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Old 03-23-2017, 09:43 PM   #14
ZenerWing
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Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Canton, OH
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2017 WRX
Pure Red

Default Hello

So I have been watching the temperature pretty diligently, I have to get to work and its about 30 miles. I am currently searching for a second set of OEM rims for a winter set and will be buying a winter tire. I have to get to work regardless of what mother nature is doing so I feel like it wouldn't be so bad just getting a second set. I have enjoyed the chaotic weather though...I left work yesterday am and it was 17, left for work same day in the evening and it was near 60. haha. Thanks for the info, I will just not drive like an idiot and hopefully not destroy these tires at the current temperature range.
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